Recent Water Damage Posts

Storm Surge Hazard Maps

10/21/2019 (Permalink)

Introduction to the Hazard Maps

This national depiction of storm surge flooding vulnerability helps people living in hurricane-prone coastal areas along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), Hawaii, and Hispaniola to evaluate their risk to the storm surge hazard. These maps make it clear that storm surge is not just a beachfront problem, with the risk of storm surge extending many miles inland from the immediate coastline in some areas. If you discover via these maps that you live in an area vulnerable to storm surge, find out today if you live in a hurricane storm surge evacuation zone as prescribed by your local emergency management agency. If you do live in such an evacuation zone, decide today where you will go and how you will get there, if and when you're instructed by your emergency manager to evacuate. If you don't live in one of those evacuation zones, then perhaps you can identify someone you care about who does live in an evacuation zone, and you could plan in advance to be their inland evacuation destination – if you live in a structure that is safe from the wind and outside of flood-prone areas.

Storm Surge

10/3/2019 (Permalink)

Storm Surge

Storm surge is water from the ocean that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around a hurricane. Storm surge is fast and can produce extreme coastal and inland flooding. When hurricanes cause storm surge, over 20 feet of water can be produced and pushed towards the shore and several miles inland destroying property and endangering lives in its path.  

Be Informed

  • Storm surge is historically the leading cause of hurricane-related deaths in the United States.

  • Water weighs about 1,700 pounds per cubic yard, so battering waves from surge can easily demolish buildings and cause massive destruction along the coast.

  • Storm surge undermines roads and foundations when it erodes material out from underneath them.

  • Just one inch of water can cause $25,000 of damage to your home. Homeowners and renter’s insurance do not typically cover flood damage.

Hurricanes

10/2/2019 (Permalink)

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30. Hurricanes:

  • Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
  • Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
  • Are most active in September.

Disasters and Emergencies

10/1/2019 (Permalink)

While flooding can happen at any time, floods can result from rain or melting snow making them common in the spring. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry. Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death.

Know what disasters and hazards could affect your area, how to get emergency alerts, and where you would go if you and your family need to evacuate.  Make sure your family has a plan and practices it often.

After a Flood

9/12/2019 (Permalink)

After The Flood

  • Listen to local officials for when it is safe to return home.
  • Contact your insurance agent to talk about claims.
  • Tune to local media for information on any kind of help that may be given by the state or federal government or other groups.
  • Stay away from floodwaters. Water may be dirty with oil, gasoline or raw sewage.
  • Fixed broken septic tanks, cesspools, pits and leaching systems as soon as you can. Damaged sewer systems are serious health problems.
  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Clean and cleanse everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals. 
  • Rest often and eat well.
  • Keep a manageable schedule. Make a list and do jobs one at a time.
  • Check references if you hire cleanup or repair contractors. Be sure they are trained to do the job. Be wary of people who drive through neighborhoods offering help in cleaning up or fixing your home.

SERVPRO of Lincoln/Northeast Gaston Counties understands how stressful it can be to deal with water damage. Let us handle your clean-up and let us deal with your insurance company!

How to Protect Your Home from Flood Damage

5/7/2019 (Permalink)

How to Protect Your Home from Flood Damage 

  • Consider flood insurance (especially if you live in areas where weather-related flooding is common). Government-issued disaster assistance doesn’t always cover the cost of damage from a flood, so it’s important to consider a supplemental insurance policy.
  • Bring appliances such as utilities, broilers, window air conditioning units and other HVAC equipment to higher ground if possible, as these items are particularly vulnerable to flood damage.
  • Hire a trusted plumber to install a sewage water backstop or sump pump. Some cities offer programs to fund the installation of these types of valves. Check with your local official to see if this is offered in your area.
  • Fill any holes or cracks in foundation with caulk or patching to prevent potential leaks.